Gen Nakatsu

Gen Nakatsu

She was born on 4 October 1889. Her maiden name is Gen Ueyama. She was a housewife. Her family includes Naojiro Nakatsu (husband), Hideko Sato (daughter; nee Hideko Nakatsu), Naoye Yamashita (daughter; nee Naoye Nakatsu), Teruo Nakatsu (son), and Fumiyo Nakatsu (daughter). Her home address is listed as P.O. Box 41, 82 Moncton Street, Steveston, BC. She was forcibly uprooted to Greenwood, BC.

Metadata

ForenameGen
SurnameNakatsu
Regularized NameGen Nakatsu
Custodian Identification Number5785
NationalityNaturalized Canadian
ResidenceGreenwood, BC

Collections

Custodian Case Files (1)

Shared Surnames

Nakatsu
NameSee also
?jirou Nakatsu
Buntaro Nakatsu
Buntaro Nakatsu
Buntaro Nakatsu
Buntaro Nakatsu
Buntarou Nakatsu
Chiyato Nakatsu
Chokichi Nakatsu
Fukumatsu Nakatsu
Fumiyo Nakatsu
Gen Nakatsu
Gen Nakatsu
Gen Nakatsu
Haruko Nakatsu
Hatsu Nakatsu
Hatsu Nakatsu
Hatsue Nakatsu
Hatsue Nakatsu
Ichimatsu Nakatsu
Juichi Nakatsu
Jujiro Nakatsu
Kaneo Nakatsu
Kaneo Nakatsu
Kaneshiro Nakatsu
Kaneshiro Nakatsu
Kaneshiro Nakatsu
Kanichi Nakatsu
Kanichi Nakatsu
Kannosuke Nakatsu
Kannosuke Nakatsu
Kannosuke Nakatsu
Kanshijyo Nakatsu
Kanshiro Nakatsu
Kanshiro Nakatsu
Kenshirou Nakatsu
Kichinosuke Nakatsu
Kichinosuke Nakatsu
Kimiko Nakatsu
Kimiyo Nakatsu
Kimiyo Nakatsu
Komae Nakatsu
Kunijiro Nakatsu
Kunijiro Nakatsu
M. Nakatsu
Manjiro Nakatsu
Mitsue Nakatsu
Miyoharu Nakatsu
Miyoko Nakatsu
N Nakatsu
N Nakatsu
N Nakatsu
N Nakatsu
Naojiro Nakatsu
Naojiro Nakatsu
Naojiro Nakatsu
Naojirou Nakatsu
Naonojyo Nakatsu
Shizuko Nakatsu
Taikichi Nakatsu
Tatsu Nakatsu
Teruo Nakatsu
Teruo Nakatsu
Teruo Nakatsu
Tokutaro Nakatsu
Tomekichi Nakatsu
Tomematsu Nakatsu
Tomematsu Nakatsu
Toshio Nakatsu
Toshio Nakatsu
Tsugi Nakatsu
Tsunekichi Nakatsu
Tsunekichi Nakatsu
Tsuneko Nakatsu
Tsunenobu Nakatsu
Unosuke Nakatsu
Wakano Nakatsu
Wataru Nakatsu
Wataru Nakatsu
Wataru Nakatsu
Wataru Nakatsu
Yaeko Nakatsu
Yonekichi Nakatsu
Yoshie Nakatsu
Yoshie Nakatsu
Yoshiharu Nakatsu
Yoshikazu Nakatsu
Yoshikazu Nakatsu
Yoshiko Nakatsu

Terminology

Readers of these historical materials will encounter derogatory references to Japanese Canadians and euphemisms used to obscure the intent and impacts of the internment and dispossession. While these are important realities of the history, the Landscapes of Injustice Research Collective urges users to carefully consider their own terminological choices in writing and speaking about this topic today as we confront past injustice. See our statement on terminology, and related sources here.