Unosuke Sakamoto

Unosuke Sakamoto

A member of the Japanese Fisherman's Liaison Committee during the sale of fishing vessels. Interviewed in the 1970s by the BC archives and quoted at length in Steveston Recollected. Known connection to Kishizo Kimura - Unosuke Sakamoto (born June 14, 1903; died January 28, 1985) was an Issei fisherman. Before WWII, Sakamoto lived in Vancouver, Steveston, and Japan. He fished 45 years in the Fraser River for Co-op, Scotch Cannery and Canfisco. Interned in Minto Mine, he worked in a sawmill as a logger before returning to coast in 1949. (Source: Kimura Appendix)
A Unosuke Sakamoto is listed as one of the Japanese-Canadian fishing boat owners whose boat was seized by the Custodian in 1942. Sakamoto owned a gill-netter worth $925.00. There is no sale information for his boat. However, written across his record is a note stating that the "registered owner" of his boat was BC Packers, not Sakamoto. Presumably, once government authorities realized this, the boat reverted back to the ownership of BC Packers without being sold. Sakamoto's address is listed as Claxton Cannery, Skeena River, B.C. He also owned a boat known as "U.S.," which was another gill-netter sold to Canfisco for 1150 on May 8, 1942. In this case, Sakamoto's address is listed as "Steveston, B.C."

Metadata

SurnameSakamoto
ForenameUnosuke
Regularized NameUnosuke Sakamoto

Collections

Other Archival Files (2)

Shared Surnames

Sakamoto
NameSee also
Sakamoto
Aiko Sakamoto
Asakichi Sakamoto
Asao Sakamoto
Asaye Sakamoto
Aya Sakamoto
Ayano Sakamoto
Barbara Sakamoto
Bud Sakamoto
Bunzo Sakamoto
Bunzo Sakamoto
Chiyoko Sakamoto
Francis Sakamoto
Fuji Sakamoto
Fumizou Sakamoto
Genhachiro Sakamoto
H. Sakamoto
Hanhyou Sakamoto
Hanpai Sakamoto
Hanpe Sakamoto
Hanpei Sakamoto
Hatsu Sakamoto
Hatsune Sakamoto
Hatsune Sakamoto
Hazue Sakamoto
Heikichi Sakamoto
Heikichi Sakamoto
Hidemi Sakamoto
Hideo Sakamoto
Hideo Sakamoto
Hideo Sakamoto
Hideo Sakamoto
Hideo Sakamoto
Hideo Sakamoto
Hiroji Sakamoto
Hiroko Sakamoto
Hiroye Sakamoto
Ito Sakamoto
Katsuhige Sakamoto
Kazumi Sakamoto
Kenneth Sakamoto
Kichie Sakamoto
Kimi Sakamoto
Kimiko Sakamoto
Kingo Sakamoto
Kitaro Sakamoto
Kiyoye Sakamoto
Koichi Sakamoto
Kojiro Sakamoto
Machie Sakamoto
Machie Sakamoto
Mamoru Sakamoto
Mamoru Sakamoto
Manzo Sakamoto
Mark Sakamoto
Masahiro Sakamoto
Masumi Sakamoto
Matsuyo Sakamoto
Minoru Sakamoto
Minoru Sakamoto
Minoru Sakamoto
Mitsue Sakamoto
Mitsuko Sakamoto
Miyoshi Sakamoto
Motoko Sakamoto
N. Sakamoto
Naohiko Sakamoto
Naoichi Sakamoto
Noboru Sakamoto
Nobuko Sakamoto
Nobuyuki Sakamoto
Sadakichi Sakamoto
Sadakichi Sakamoto
Saichiro Sakamoto
Sakichi Sakamoto
Shigeji Sakamoto
Shigeji Sakamoto
Shigeru Sakamoto
Shizue Sakamoto
Sueshiro Sakamoto
Sugae Sakamoto
Sugae Sakamoto
T Sakamoto
T. &Y. Sakamoto
Tadaki Sakamoto
Tadayoshi Sakamoto
Tadayoshi Sakamoto
Tadayoshi Sakamoto
Tadayoshi Sakamoto
Tadayoshi Sakamoto
Taira Sakamoto
Taka Sakamoto
Take Sakamoto
Taketoshi Sakamoto
Tokutaro Sakamoto
Tokutarou Sakamoto
Toshi Sakamoto
Toshio Sakamoto
Toshio Sakamoto
Toshio Sakamoto
Toshiyuki & Katsushige Sakamoto
Toshiyuki Sakamoto
U Sakamoto
Unokichi Sakamoto
Unosuke Sakamoto
Unosuke Sakamoto
Unosuke Sakamoto
Unosuke Sakamoto
Unosuke Sakamoto
Unosuke Sakamoto
Unosuke Sakamoto
Unosuke Sakamoto
Ushijyo Sakamoto
Waku Sakamoto
Wari Sakamoto
Warie Sakamoto
Yahichi Sakamoto
Yasue Sakamoto
Yasue Sakamoto
Yasuo Sakamoto
Yasutaro Sakamoto
Yasutaro Sakamoto
Yasutaro Sakamoto
Yoshio Sakamoto
Yoshitaka Sakamoto
Yumi Sakamoto
Yuzo Sakamoto

Terminology

Readers of these historical materials will encounter derogatory references to Japanese Canadians and euphemisms used to obscure the intent and impacts of the internment and dispossession. While these are important realities of the history, the Landscapes of Injustice Research Collective urges users to carefully consider their own terminological choices in writing and speaking about this topic today as we confront past injustice. See our statement on terminology, and related sources here.